The U.S. Air Force on Tuesday night sent two B-1B bombers to conduct mock drills off both of South Korea’s coasts on the Korean Peninsula. A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 37th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, deployed from Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, during a 10-hour mission from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, flying in the vicinity of Kyushu, Japan, the East China Sea, and the Korean peninsula, August 7, 2017 (HST). (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Gerald Willis) The show of force during tense times comes despite North Korea threatening to shoot down U.S. bombers if it has to, after the country led by dictator Kim Jong Un claimed

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The U.S. Air Force on Tuesday night sent two B-1B bombers to conduct mock drills off both of South Korea’s coasts on the Korean Peninsula. A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 37th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, deployed from Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, during a 10-hour mission from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, flying in the vicinity of Kyushu, Japan, the East China Sea, and the Korean peninsula, August 7, 2017 (HST). (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Gerald Willis) The show of force during tense times comes despite North Korea threatening to shoot down U.S. bombers if it has to, after the country led by dictator Kim Jong Un claimed

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President Donald Trump’s bold approach to North Korea has horrified many and raised the issue of nuclear war into everyday conversation, but the unconventional tactic may work in a roundabout way, an expert on US-China relations and North Korea says. Trump’s fiery rhetoric and the administration’s decision to make North Korea its top national security priority have “changed the momentum” on the issue, Yun Sun, a senior associate at the Stimson Center, a Washington, DC-based think tank, told Business Insider. In recent months, North Korea has shocked the world by demonstrating that it’s most likely just a few months from developing a nuclear-equipped intercontinental ballistic missile. President Donald Trump has responded

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President Donald Trump’s bold approach to North Korea has horrified many and raised the issue of nuclear war into everyday conversation, but the unconventional tactic may work in a roundabout way, an expert on US-China relations and North Korea says. Trump’s fiery rhetoric and the administration’s decision to make North Korea its top national security priority have “changed the momentum” on the issue, Yun Sun, a senior associate at the Stimson Center, a Washington, DC-based think tank, told Business Insider. In recent months, North Korea has shocked the world by demonstrating that it’s most likely just a few months from developing a nuclear-equipped intercontinental ballistic missile. President Donald Trump has responded

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Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told the annual convention of the Association of the US Army on Monday that they should “be ready” with military options should diplomacy fail with North Korea. When asked what the US military could do to make war with North Korea less likely, Mattis didn’t sugarcoat it or offer false hope. “There’s one thing the US Army can do, and that is, you have got to be ready to ensure that we have military options that our president can employ, if needed,” said Mattis. Mattis said the US is currently pursuing a “diplomatically led effort” that has seen the UN Security Council twice vote unanimously to sanction

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Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told the annual convention of the Association of the US Army on Monday that they should “be ready” with military options should diplomacy fail with North Korea. When asked what the US military could do to make war with North Korea less likely, Mattis didn’t sugarcoat it or offer false hope. “There’s one thing the US Army can do, and that is, you have got to be ready to ensure that we have military options that our president can employ, if needed,” said Mattis. Mattis said the US is currently pursuing a “diplomatically led effort” that has seen the UN Security Council twice vote unanimously to sanction

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North Korea has likely already foiled the United States and South Korea’s plans to take out Kim Jong Un, according to the South Korean news agency Yonhap, as North Korean hackers have stolen hundreds of gigabytes of military documents, including the plans to take out dictator Kim Jong Un. North Korean hackers (Twitter) Yonhap reported Tuesday that South Korean Democratic Party Rep. Lee Cheol-hee said hackers have stolen “a large amount of classified military documents” – 235 gigabytes worth – including the so-named “decapitation plan.” North Korean hackers (Twitter) The hackers breached South Korea’s Defense Integrated Data Center last September, Cheol-hee told Yonhap, and stole the classified, secret files that included Operational Plans 5015

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North Korea has likely already foiled the United States and South Korea’s plans to take out Kim Jong Un, according to the South Korean news agency Yonhap, as North Korean hackers have stolen hundreds of gigabytes of military documents, including the plans to take out dictator Kim Jong Un. North Korean hackers (Twitter) Yonhap reported Tuesday that South Korean Democratic Party Rep. Lee Cheol-hee said hackers have stolen “a large amount of classified military documents” – 235 gigabytes worth – including the so-named “decapitation plan.” North Korean hackers (Twitter) The hackers breached South Korea’s Defense Integrated Data Center last September, Cheol-hee told Yonhap, and stole the classified, secret files that included Operational Plans 5015

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Jimmy Carter, the 93-year-old former 39th President of the United States, has told a University of Georgia emeritus professor that he would like to visit Pyongyang and discuss a “permanent peace” treaty with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un to avoid a second Korean War, according to a report. Jimmy Carter (Twitter) “Carter wants to meet with the North Korean leader [Kim Jong Un] and play a constructive role for peace on the Korean Peninsula as he did in 1994,” according to Park Han-shik, an emeritus professor of international affairs at the University of Georgia, the Korea JoongAng Daily reported. “Should former President Carter be able to visit North Korea, he would

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Jimmy Carter, the 93-year-old former 39th President of the United States, has told a University of Georgia emeritus professor that he would like to visit Pyongyang and discuss a “permanent peace” treaty with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un to avoid a second Korean War, according to a report. Jimmy Carter (Twitter) “Carter wants to meet with the North Korean leader [Kim Jong Un] and play a constructive role for peace on the Korean Peninsula as he did in 1994,” according to Park Han-shik, an emeritus professor of international affairs at the University of Georgia, the Korea JoongAng Daily reported. “Should former President Carter be able to visit North Korea, he would

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President Donald Trump is considering a trip to visit the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) that divides North and South Korea, according to a report from South Korean news agency Yonhap, and he is planning to send a message to North Korea, either “verbally or kinetically.” This would be Trump’s first trip to the Korean Peninsula as President. Trump trip to DMZ (Twitter) A defense source who spoke on the condition of anonymity told Yonhap that President Trump might visit the DMZ while he is visiting South Korea in early November, and the White House has “dispatched an advance team of working-level officials in late September to check candidate sites for Trump’s ‘special activity’

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President Donald Trump is considering a trip to visit the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) that divides North and South Korea, according to a report from South Korean news agency Yonhap, and he is planning to send a message to North Korea, either “verbally or kinetically.” This would be Trump’s first trip to the Korean Peninsula as President. Trump trip to DMZ (Twitter) A defense source who spoke on the condition of anonymity told Yonhap that President Trump might visit the DMZ while he is visiting South Korea in early November, and the White House has “dispatched an advance team of working-level officials in late September to check candidate sites for Trump’s ‘special activity’

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There’s a new Kim in town in North Korea: Kim Yo Jong, the 28-year-old, ponytailed sister of Pyongyang’s leader Kim Jong Un, was promoted Sunday to the hermit kingdom’s highest decision-making body for affairs of state. Kim Yo Jong was selected as an “alternate member” of the Political Bureau of the Central Committee within the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea, the North’s official state Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said. The Political Bureau largely exists to rubber stamp Kim Jong Un’s decisions, but as an alternate member Kim Yo Jong will be able to take part in policy debates, including military ones, according to the website North Korea Leadership Watch. Kim

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There’s a new Kim in town in North Korea: Kim Yo Jong, the 28-year-old, ponytailed sister of Pyongyang’s leader Kim Jong Un, was promoted Sunday to the hermit kingdom’s highest decision-making body for affairs of state. Kim Yo Jong was selected as an “alternate member” of the Political Bureau of the Central Committee within the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea, the North’s official state Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said. The Political Bureau largely exists to rubber stamp Kim Jong Un’s decisions, but as an alternate member Kim Yo Jong will be able to take part in policy debates, including military ones, according to the website North Korea Leadership Watch. Kim

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North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un said over the weekend that the country’s economy “has grown,” despite economic sanctions imposed by the U.N. Security Council, and that North Korea’s nuclear weapons are “a powerful deterrent.” This comes in the face of President Donald Trump tweeting over the weekend and on Monday, alluding to military action on the Korean Peninsula. “Our country has been unsuccessfully dealing with North Korea for 25 years, giving billions of dollars and getting nothing. Policy didn’t work,” Trump tweeted Monday morning. Donald Trump (Twitter) North Korea’s state-run media, Korean Central News Agency, reported on Sunday that Kim Jong Un said his country’s nuclear weapons are a “powerful

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North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un said over the weekend that the country’s economy “has grown,” despite economic sanctions imposed by the U.N. Security Council, and that North Korea’s nuclear weapons are “a powerful deterrent.” This comes in the face of President Donald Trump tweeting over the weekend and on Monday, alluding to military action on the Korean Peninsula. “Our country has been unsuccessfully dealing with North Korea for 25 years, giving billions of dollars and getting nothing. Policy didn’t work,” Trump tweeted Monday morning. Donald Trump (Twitter) North Korea’s state-run media, Korean Central News Agency, reported on Sunday that Kim Jong Un said his country’s nuclear weapons are a “powerful

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U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, and North Korea, have traded almost countless threats towards each other publicly over the course of 2017. Nicholas Kristof, who recently was in North Korea reporting and interviewing various officials for the New York Times wrote an October 5th article about his trip. In the article, he notes how the country is galvanizing around Kim Jong-un and even everyday people are prepared for war and want to wipe the U.S. off the map if provoked. However, it’s hard to not assume that these people who were interviewed are all actors in an overarching propaganda war as millions are starving on a daily

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U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, and North Korea, have traded almost countless threats towards each other publicly over the course of 2017. Nicholas Kristof, who recently was in North Korea reporting and interviewing various officials for the New York Times wrote an October 5th article about his trip. In the article, he notes how the country is galvanizing around Kim Jong-un and even everyday people are prepared for war and want to wipe the U.S. off the map if provoked. However, it’s hard to not assume that these people who were interviewed are all actors in an overarching propaganda war as millions are starving on a daily

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President Donald Trump left an ominous impression on Thursday night when he met with senior military leaders. The military leaders were at the White House with their spouses for dinner with the President and First Lady, to discuss military options with the President. As they group was taking photos, the President said it was “the calm before the storm.” When asked what he meant, he replied: “You’ll find out.” “We have the world’s great military people in this room,” he added. Listen to the President’s remarks: The President met with military leaders – including Defense Secretary Jim Mattis – so he could be provided with military options. President Trump and military

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President Donald Trump left an ominous impression on Thursday night when he met with senior military leaders. The military leaders were at the White House with their spouses for dinner with the President and First Lady, to discuss military options with the President. As they group was taking photos, the President said it was “the calm before the storm.” When asked what he meant, he replied: “You’ll find out.” “We have the world’s great military people in this room,” he added. Listen to the President’s remarks: The President met with military leaders – including Defense Secretary Jim Mattis – so he could be provided with military options. President Trump and military

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