On Wednesday, the remains of what are presumed to be 55 U.S. troops arrived back home on American soil, 65 years after the Korean War ended. Honor guardsmen, assigned to the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM), move a flag-draped case from a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during an honorable carry ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, Aug. 1, 2018. The United Nations Command recently repatriated 55 transfer cases from North Korea that contain what are believed to be the remains of American service members lost in the Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Apryl Hall) An honor guard detail of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command personnel conducts

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On Wednesday, the remains of what are presumed to be 55 U.S. troops arrived back home on American soil, 65 years after the Korean War ended. Honor guardsmen, assigned to the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM), move a flag-draped case from a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during an honorable carry ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, Aug. 1, 2018. The United Nations Command recently repatriated 55 transfer cases from North Korea that contain what are believed to be the remains of American service members lost in the Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Apryl Hall) An honor guard detail of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command personnel conducts

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President Trump on Thursday penned a thank-you tweet to North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, thanking him for beginning the process of repatriating what are presumed to be U.S. troops’ remains. “Thank you to Chairman Kim Jong Un for keeping your word & starting the process of sending home the remains of our great and beloved missing fallen! I am not at all surprised that you took this kind action. Also, thank you for your nice letter – l look forward to seeing you soon,” Trump wrote. Thank you to Chairman Kim Jong Un for keeping your word & starting the process of sending home the remains of our great and

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President Trump on Thursday penned a thank-you tweet to North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, thanking him for beginning the process of repatriating what are presumed to be U.S. troops’ remains. “Thank you to Chairman Kim Jong Un for keeping your word & starting the process of sending home the remains of our great and beloved missing fallen! I am not at all surprised that you took this kind action. Also, thank you for your nice letter – l look forward to seeing you soon,” Trump wrote. Thank you to Chairman Kim Jong Un for keeping your word & starting the process of sending home the remains of our great and

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Last week, North Korea handed over 55 sets of remains from the Korean War to the United States, and a report on Wednesday revealed that just one set of dog tags was included with the 55 remains. While it is remains to be seen if all the remains are of U.S. troops, North Korea claims that all of the remains are of U.S. soldiers. One official in charge of identifying the remains is confident that the remains are “likely to be American,” USA Today reported on Wednesday. Lab Director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Dr. John Byrd said the team conducted a two-day forensic review at the Osan Air Base in South

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Last week, North Korea handed over 55 sets of remains from the Korean War to the United States, and a report on Wednesday revealed that just one set of dog tags was included with the 55 remains. While it is remains to be seen if all the remains are of U.S. troops, North Korea claims that all of the remains are of U.S. soldiers. One official in charge of identifying the remains is confident that the remains are “likely to be American,” USA Today reported on Wednesday. Lab Director of the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Dr. John Byrd said the team conducted a two-day forensic review at the Osan Air Base in South

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North Korea officials are reportedly growing frustrated about delays in the official process to declare the end of the Korean War. Kim Hong-gul, Chairman of the Korean Council for Reconciliation and Cooperation – and son of former South Korean president Kim Dae-jung – told the South China Morning Post that during his trip to the North Korean capital, officials were disappointed over the declaration talks. “North Korean officials said they are frustrated about the delay and asked whether there is a valid reason for such slow progress,” Kim said. #NorthKorea frustrated about delay to end-of-war declaration, says son of former South Korean president Kim Dae-jung https://t.co/KxoGs0L9M0 via @politico — NCNK (@NCNKorea) July

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North Korea officials are reportedly growing frustrated about delays in the official process to declare the end of the Korean War. Kim Hong-gul, Chairman of the Korean Council for Reconciliation and Cooperation – and son of former South Korean president Kim Dae-jung – told the South China Morning Post that during his trip to the North Korean capital, officials were disappointed over the declaration talks. “North Korean officials said they are frustrated about the delay and asked whether there is a valid reason for such slow progress,” Kim said. #NorthKorea frustrated about delay to end-of-war declaration, says son of former South Korean president Kim Dae-jung https://t.co/KxoGs0L9M0 via @politico — NCNK (@NCNKorea) July

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The United States successfully received the transfer of 55 sets of remains from North Korea on Friday. North Korea handed over 55 transfer cases containing what are believed to be the remains of U.S. troops killed in the Korean War. U.S. personnel carried the small cases one by one, draped with flags, from a U.S. military transport plane at Osan Air Base in South Korea, Reuters reported. Download our FREE Mobile App – The Highest Rated Military News App in the World! The return of the remains is one of the issues agreed upon between President Trump and Kim Jong Un at last month’s summit in Singapore, along with denuclearization and

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The United States successfully received the transfer of 55 sets of remains from North Korea on Friday. North Korea handed over 55 transfer cases containing what are believed to be the remains of U.S. troops killed in the Korean War. U.S. personnel carried the small cases one by one, draped with flags, from a U.S. military transport plane at Osan Air Base in South Korea, Reuters reported. Download our FREE Mobile App – The Highest Rated Military News App in the World! The return of the remains is one of the issues agreed upon between President Trump and Kim Jong Un at last month’s summit in Singapore, along with denuclearization and

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President Donald Trump remains upbeat about eliminating North Korea’s nuclear weapons although the communist regime has yet to shutter its nuclear program, the secretary of state has told Congress. “Yes, they continue to produce fissile material,” Mike Pompeo said of the North in response to a question from Sen. Ed Markey, D-Massachussetts, during a hearing Wednesday before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The administration’s objective remains the “final, fully verified denuclearization of North Korea, as agreed to by Chairman Kim Jong Un,” Pompeo told the lawmakers. Pompeo, who earlier this month traveled to Pyongyang for the third time since April, said last week that the North Koreans reaffirmed their commitment to

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President Donald Trump remains upbeat about eliminating North Korea’s nuclear weapons although the communist regime has yet to shutter its nuclear program, the secretary of state has told Congress. “Yes, they continue to produce fissile material,” Mike Pompeo said of the North in response to a question from Sen. Ed Markey, D-Massachussetts, during a hearing Wednesday before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The administration’s objective remains the “final, fully verified denuclearization of North Korea, as agreed to by Chairman Kim Jong Un,” Pompeo told the lawmakers. Pompeo, who earlier this month traveled to Pyongyang for the third time since April, said last week that the North Koreans reaffirmed their commitment to

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This year, July 27 marks the 65th year since the signing of the Korean Armistice Agreement. The anniversary was marked in a special way this year, as North Korea handed over the remains of at least 50 service members believed to be U.S. troops who were killed during the Korean War. The repatriation took place Friday, and the remains have reportedly left North Korea and will most likely land at Osan Air Base in South Korea and then be identified in Hawaii. The U.S. Census Bureau recently released information about Korean War veterans: Download our FREE Mobile App – The Highest Rated Military News App in the World! Sixty-five years after

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This year, July 27 marks the 65th year since the signing of the Korean Armistice Agreement. The anniversary was marked in a special way this year, as North Korea handed over the remains of at least 50 service members believed to be U.S. troops who were killed during the Korean War. The repatriation took place Friday, and the remains have reportedly left North Korea and will most likely land at Osan Air Base in South Korea and then be identified in Hawaii. The U.S. Census Bureau recently released information about Korean War veterans: Download our FREE Mobile App – The Highest Rated Military News App in the World! Sixty-five years after

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The list of American civilians lost in North Korea during the 1950-53 war is short. Just seven names, compared with more than 7,000 troops. But William Evans says the government has a responsibility to try to bring them all home. His father and namesake was a mining engineer he says acted as an adviser to the U.S. military in Seoul when the Korean War broke out. He was captured by the North Koreans and died alongside U.S. soldiers imprisoned by a brutal commander known as “The Tiger.” Evans, a 72-year-old retired professor, is hoping his father may be brought home as the hunt for remains gains new attention. Download our FREE

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The list of American civilians lost in North Korea during the 1950-53 war is short. Just seven names, compared with more than 7,000 troops. But William Evans says the government has a responsibility to try to bring them all home. His father and namesake was a mining engineer he says acted as an adviser to the U.S. military in Seoul when the Korean War broke out. He was captured by the North Koreans and died alongside U.S. soldiers imprisoned by a brutal commander known as “The Tiger.” Evans, a 72-year-old retired professor, is hoping his father may be brought home as the hunt for remains gains new attention. Download our FREE

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U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley recently said in an interview that the United States will never trust Russia and its leader Vladimir Putin. Haley doesn’t believe that it will ever be possible for the U.S. to trust the Kremlin due to its previous record of dishonestly. “We don’t trust Russia; we don’t trust Putin; we never will. They’re never going to be our friend. That’s just a fact,” Ambassador Haley said in an exclusive interview with CBN News this week. Despite her distrust of Moscow, the ambassador believes that it’s important for there to be a dialogue between the two countries. She hopes that the U.S. will continue to communicate

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U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley recently said in an interview that the United States will never trust Russia and its leader Vladimir Putin. Haley doesn’t believe that it will ever be possible for the U.S. to trust the Kremlin due to its previous record of dishonestly. “We don’t trust Russia; we don’t trust Putin; we never will. They’re never going to be our friend. That’s just a fact,” Ambassador Haley said in an exclusive interview with CBN News this week. Despite her distrust of Moscow, the ambassador believes that it’s important for there to be a dialogue between the two countries. She hopes that the U.S. will continue to communicate

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A top U.S. commander of forces in South Korea said on Saturday that North Korea still maintains the materials required for nuclear weapons development, despite agreeing to denuclearize. Army Gen. Vincent Brooks said nuclear “production capability is still intact” in North Korea, CNBC reported. “We haven’t seen a complete shutdown of production yet. We have not seen a removal of fuel rods,” he added. Just last month, North Korea leader Kim Jong Un joined President Donald Trump for a summit in Singapore to discuss denuclearization. Both leaders called the meeting a success, and agreed to North Korea’s denuclearization efforts. Download our FREE Mobile App – The Highest Rated Military News App

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A top U.S. commander of forces in South Korea said on Saturday that North Korea still maintains the materials required for nuclear weapons development, despite agreeing to denuclearize. Army Gen. Vincent Brooks said nuclear “production capability is still intact” in North Korea, CNBC reported. “We haven’t seen a complete shutdown of production yet. We have not seen a removal of fuel rods,” he added. Just last month, North Korea leader Kim Jong Un joined President Donald Trump for a summit in Singapore to discuss denuclearization. Both leaders called the meeting a success, and agreed to North Korea’s denuclearization efforts. Download our FREE Mobile App – The Highest Rated Military News App

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