North Korea is claiming the U.S. hasn’t seen anything yet, and it is threatening to test a Hydrogen bomb, or H-bomb, over the Pacific Ocean in response to President Donald Trump’s speech at the United Nations earlier this week. “This could probably mean the strongest hydrogen bomb test over the Pacific Ocean. Regarding which measures to take, I don’t really know since it is what Kim Jong Un does,” North Korea’s Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho told reporters on Friday. (Twitter) This comes after a slew of accusations from North Korean dictator Jim Kong Un on Thursday, in response to President Trump’s intense U.N. General Assembly speech on Tuesday, during which the President

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North Korea is claiming the U.S. hasn’t seen anything yet, and it is threatening to test a Hydrogen bomb, or H-bomb, over the Pacific Ocean in response to President Donald Trump’s speech at the United Nations earlier this week. “This could probably mean the strongest hydrogen bomb test over the Pacific Ocean. Regarding which measures to take, I don’t really know since it is what Kim Jong Un does,” North Korea’s Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho told reporters on Friday. (Twitter) This comes after a slew of accusations from North Korean dictator Jim Kong Un on Thursday, in response to President Trump’s intense U.N. General Assembly speech on Tuesday, during which the President

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Thursday, the same day that U.S. President Donald Trump signed new sanctions against North Korea, North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un threatened Donald Trump that he would ‘pay dearly’ for his threat to destroy North Korea if Trump had to defend the United States or its allies. This comes a day after U.S. President Donald Trump mocked Kim Jong Un as a “rocket man” who was on a “suicide mission.” The North Korean dictator was reacting to Trump’s speech to the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday where Trump stated that “forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.” The new sanctions

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Thursday, the same day that U.S. President Donald Trump signed new sanctions against North Korea, North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un threatened Donald Trump that he would ‘pay dearly’ for his threat to destroy North Korea if Trump had to defend the United States or its allies. This comes a day after U.S. President Donald Trump mocked Kim Jong Un as a “rocket man” who was on a “suicide mission.” The North Korean dictator was reacting to Trump’s speech to the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday where Trump stated that “forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.” The new sanctions

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Where does North Korea, whose gross domestic product is less than that of some American cities, get the money to fund its nuclear efforts? Kim Jong-un and his regime obtain much of their money from a vast series of criminal enterprises that trade in everything from goods made by forced labor to counterfeit currency to narcotics. And like many insurgent groups and criminal organizations worldwide, Kim and his circle also traffic in illegal tobacco. That may sound like something of an anticlimax. But smuggling tobacco products so they may be sold without the high taxes and tariffs that prevail in many countries is big business: globally, tens of billions of dollars

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Where does North Korea, whose gross domestic product is less than that of some American cities, get the money to fund its nuclear efforts? Kim Jong-un and his regime obtain much of their money from a vast series of criminal enterprises that trade in everything from goods made by forced labor to counterfeit currency to narcotics. And like many insurgent groups and criminal organizations worldwide, Kim and his circle also traffic in illegal tobacco. That may sound like something of an anticlimax. But smuggling tobacco products so they may be sold without the high taxes and tariffs that prevail in many countries is big business: globally, tens of billions of dollars

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North Korea is already starting to feel the pinch from United Nations sanctions, in the form of fuel shortages, after the Security Council banned nearly all the country’s exports earlier this month, and previously banned its export revenue by one-third, or about $1 billion, over the summer. “We have some indications that there are beginning to appear evidence of fuel shortages,” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters Wednesday, the Washington Examiner reported. “We knew that these sanctions are going to take some time to be felt because we knew that the North Koreans, based on information that the Chinese had shared with us and others had shared with us, had basically

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North Korea is already starting to feel the pinch from United Nations sanctions, in the form of fuel shortages, after the Security Council banned nearly all the country’s exports earlier this month, and previously banned its export revenue by one-third, or about $1 billion, over the summer. “We have some indications that there are beginning to appear evidence of fuel shortages,” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters Wednesday, the Washington Examiner reported. “We knew that these sanctions are going to take some time to be felt because we knew that the North Koreans, based on information that the Chinese had shared with us and others had shared with us, had basically

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President Donald Trump address the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, but it wasn’t until about two days later that a North Korean official responded to Trump’s speech, during which the President said “Rocket Man” Kim Jong Un is on a “suicide mission” and that the U.S. would “totally destroy” North Korea if need be. North Korea has come out slinging harsh words following U.N. Security Council sanctions that ban nearly all of its exports. On Wednesday, North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong-ho said the President’s speech and threats were “the sound of a dog barking,” according to the South Korean Yonhap News Agency. (Twitter) “If he was thinking he could scare us

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President Donald Trump address the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, but it wasn’t until about two days later that a North Korean official responded to Trump’s speech, during which the President said “Rocket Man” Kim Jong Un is on a “suicide mission” and that the U.S. would “totally destroy” North Korea if need be. North Korea has come out slinging harsh words following U.N. Security Council sanctions that ban nearly all of its exports. On Wednesday, North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong-ho said the President’s speech and threats were “the sound of a dog barking,” according to the South Korean Yonhap News Agency. (Twitter) “If he was thinking he could scare us

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While the United Nations Security Council has imposed harsh sanctions on North Korea – including banning nearly all of its exports – one country that signed off on the sanctions resolution, Russia, still continues to sell fuel to North Korea. (Twitter) It becomes a game of deceptive hide-and-seek, as cargo ships full of fuel toward reportedly headed for other destinations leave Russia, and instead head to North Korea. Reuters reported that at least eight North Korean ships recently left Russia with fuel and went back to North Korea, rather than to other destinations they had previously declared. “Reuters has no evidence of wrongdoing by the vessels, whose movements were recorded in Reuters ship-tracking data,” it reported.

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While the United Nations Security Council has imposed harsh sanctions on North Korea – including banning nearly all of its exports – one country that signed off on the sanctions resolution, Russia, still continues to sell fuel to North Korea. (Twitter) It becomes a game of deceptive hide-and-seek, as cargo ships full of fuel toward reportedly headed for other destinations leave Russia, and instead head to North Korea. Reuters reported that at least eight North Korean ships recently left Russia with fuel and went back to North Korea, rather than to other destinations they had previously declared. “Reuters has no evidence of wrongdoing by the vessels, whose movements were recorded in Reuters ship-tracking data,” it reported.

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U.N. Security Council sanctions targeting North Korea’s missile and nuclear tests are working, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis recently said during an informal briefing with members of the press. The secretary said the sanctions, which began in 2006, have shown North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that there’s a penalty to pay for ignoring international concerns and norms. “We are putting the leader in North Korea in a position to be aware of — [with] the international community voting unanimously twice now in the United Nations Security Council — … the increasing diplomatic isolation that comes with the economic sanctions,” Mattis said. Under Pressure The secretary made a Sept. 15 trip to

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U.N. Security Council sanctions targeting North Korea’s missile and nuclear tests are working, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis recently said during an informal briefing with members of the press. The secretary said the sanctions, which began in 2006, have shown North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that there’s a penalty to pay for ignoring international concerns and norms. “We are putting the leader in North Korea in a position to be aware of — [with] the international community voting unanimously twice now in the United Nations Security Council — … the increasing diplomatic isolation that comes with the economic sanctions,” Mattis said. Under Pressure The secretary made a Sept. 15 trip to

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• Bike-sharing hubs have been spotted in downtown Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea. • The bike-share scheme could be an attempt to alleviate a fuel shortage in the reclusive state. The bike-sharing revolution has arrived in North Korea. Authorities in Pyongyang have installed the first few of 50 bicycle racks near bus and subway stations in North Korea’s capital, according to UPI and the state-owned China Global Television Network. Bike-share schemes that allow people to borrow a bike from point A and return it to point B for a small fee have taken off in cities around the world, including New York, San Francisco, Paris, and Hangzhou. The programs are heralded for their convenience and

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• Bike-sharing hubs have been spotted in downtown Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea. • The bike-share scheme could be an attempt to alleviate a fuel shortage in the reclusive state. The bike-sharing revolution has arrived in North Korea. Authorities in Pyongyang have installed the first few of 50 bicycle racks near bus and subway stations in North Korea’s capital, according to UPI and the state-owned China Global Television Network. Bike-share schemes that allow people to borrow a bike from point A and return it to point B for a small fee have taken off in cities around the world, including New York, San Francisco, Paris, and Hangzhou. The programs are heralded for their convenience and

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The state-run media out of Pyongyang in North Korea continues on its path of threats and violent rhetoric, as it warned Tuesday the U.S. faces “final ruin” if it goes to war with the country. “In case the U.S. opts for confrontation and war at last, defying the strategic position of the DPRK [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea], nuclear power of Juche and a world military giant, it will meet horrible nuclear strike and miserable and final ruin,” the regime led by dictator Kim Jong Un said Tuesday through the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), the Washington Examiner reported. (Twitter) The most recent sanctions ban about 90 percent of North Korea’s

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The state-run media out of Pyongyang in North Korea continues on its path of threats and violent rhetoric, as it warned Tuesday the U.S. faces “final ruin” if it goes to war with the country. “In case the U.S. opts for confrontation and war at last, defying the strategic position of the DPRK [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea], nuclear power of Juche and a world military giant, it will meet horrible nuclear strike and miserable and final ruin,” the regime led by dictator Kim Jong Un said Tuesday through the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), the Washington Examiner reported. (Twitter) The most recent sanctions ban about 90 percent of North Korea’s

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Defense Secretary Jim Mattis hinted that the United States still had military options left for dealing with North Korea, but did not elaborate when asked for details Monday. Most experts believe that a military strike on North Korea would invite a devastating response from Pyongyang. The city of Seoul, South Korea, home to 25 million, is well within artillery range of the North, which would likely use conventional artillery munitions and chemical weapons. But, according to Mattis, the Pentagon has a few tricks up its sleeve that wouldn’t involve the decimation of Seoul. When asked, “is there any military option the U.S. can take with North Korea that would not put Seoul at grave

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Defense Secretary Jim Mattis hinted that the United States still had military options left for dealing with North Korea, but did not elaborate when asked for details Monday. Most experts believe that a military strike on North Korea would invite a devastating response from Pyongyang. The city of Seoul, South Korea, home to 25 million, is well within artillery range of the North, which would likely use conventional artillery munitions and chemical weapons. But, according to Mattis, the Pentagon has a few tricks up its sleeve that wouldn’t involve the decimation of Seoul. When asked, “is there any military option the U.S. can take with North Korea that would not put Seoul at grave

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